© 2017 Dina Begum

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brick lane cookbook

By Dina Begum

Explore the diverse flavours of London's famous Brick Lane in this exciting new cookbook. Available now via Kitchen Press, Waterstones, Independent bookshops and Amazon. 

Reviews for Brick Lane Cookbook

 

'Dina Begum takes you on a personal journey through this iconic area, highlighting its culinary evolution, as a multi-ethnic and migrant food hub of East London. Dina's stories and modern Bangladeshi recipes are mouthwatering.'

 

Sumayya Usmani, cookbook writer and broadcaster, author of Summers Under the Tamarind Tree and Mountain Berries and Desert Spice

'Sundays were special to Dina Begum when she was a child - her dad took her to Brick Lane market. Also known as 'Bangla-town' and famed for its concentration of curry houses, it is where East meets West. Sundays are still special with street performers and the buzz of people and food from different culinary cultures - Tibetan momos, Korean grills, Jewish beigles, New York wings, Argentinian, Vietnamese, vegetarian and vegan - there is something for everyone. It is global, it is organic in nature, it showcases flavour and community camaraderie, it is street food at its best. Dina guides us through the markets and tastes of Brick Lane, bringing the the aromas and atmosphere to life with Bangladeshi home-cooking, traders' recipes, her mother's dishes and her own twists on classics. She describes the book as a 'labour of love' and it clearly is as Brick Lane has played a big role in her life and she shares that with a generous heart.'

Ghillie Basan, food and travel writer and broadcaster.

'This is a wonderful book - I'm so thrilled to see all the traditions and cultures which have sprung from Brick Lane celebrated together through these recipes. My late father was born just off Brick Lane in 1922 and spoke often about the traders who sold herrings in barrels and bagels out of sacks, and wrote a book himself about growing up as a young Jewish boy there in the 20s. He was always so excited to see how much the area changed, and yet stayed the same - its food scene reflecting that multi cultural diversity, the embracing of new people and their traditions, with those already there. I know he'd have loved a book like this - Dina has brilliantly captured this vibrant, dynamic and welcoming part of East London.' 

Felicity Spector